Tel: 0191 237 1505
 

Year 10 Curriculum 2016-2018

Moving from Key Stage 3 to Key Stage 4

 

We are constantly striving to ensure that the curriculum we offer at Astley Community High School is appropriate to the individual needs of our students. To this end, we constantly review our curriculum offering. The information in these pages reflects our latest review of the curriculum.

PATHWAYS
Some subjects are compulsory – the Government says that all students must take them. Other subjects are “Entitlements” – the Government says that students must be able to choose a subject in that area if they so wish. Not all subjects are suitable to all students. Whether or not a pupil likes and/or enjoys a subject is important, as is their ability or potential to do well in that subject. Deciding which subjects your child can or should take can be difficult.

We can help you with this. We have a wealth of information about your child. The Student Progress Leader for Year 9 and a number of other teachers meet to consider every child in the year group. Over the next few weeks we will speak to your child to ask him/her what sort of subjects he/she would like to do from September, and what his/her career aspirations may be. Using this information we will help guide your child towards what, in our professional judgment, would be the most appropriate combination of courses for your child to study at Key Stage 4.

On our website you will find details of both the compulsory examined subjects your child must take and a range of subjects for your child to choose from. You will see that the form attached to this letter lists all the optional subjects we offer. Your child will study FOUR of these subjects – one subject from Entitlement 1(Option Block A) and two subjects from Entitlement 2 (Option Block B). We also ask you to nominate reserve choices in case it isn’t possible to give your child their first choices.

The core consists of compulsory subjects that all students must follow. There is no choice.

All students follow a core of:

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Physical Education
  • Religious Education

Mathematics, Science, English Language and English Literature are taught as separate lessons with formal assessment leading to GCSEs in these subjects.

Physical Education and Religious Education are also delivered in the core but as non-examined courses. Students who wish to obtain a formal qualification in Physical Education and Religious Education can opt to choose the GCSE courses in these subjects as part of their entitlement choices.

During their 2-year Key Stage 4 course all students have curriculum time for:

  • Citizenship
  • Careers Education
  • Sex Education
  • Enrichment Experience

British Values and what it means to be British is explored and discussed as part of this curriculum time.

Please complete the Pathways Form with your child stating one option from block A and three options from block B. Remember to also nominate your reserve choices.

Our Key Stage 4 Booklet contains all of the curriculum information for current Year 10 students. Please contact us if you require a printed copy.

 

Core Non Examined Subjects

1. Why study this course?

All students will cover a PSHE programme that aims to:

• Promote their spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development 
• Prepare them for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life and ensure they are prepared to take their place in society.

As a result of the work we do with students, it is our expectation that will they become well-rounded citizens and responsible members of the communities in which they live. In addition, we are committed to equipping them with the skills required to succeed in modern Britain.

2. What students will study during this course

Our programme of study is based around a fortnightly PSHE lesson. This is complemented by RE lessons, year group assemblies, cross-curricular work, intervention activities, enrichment courses and drop in sessions. We also have a network of agencies that support students both inside and outside of school.

We use PSHE education to build on the statutory content already outlined in the national curriculum, the basic school curriculum and in statutory guidance on: drug education, financial education, sex and relationship education (SRE) and the importance of physical activity and diet for a healthy lifestyle.

We will deliver 4 key units to students which include a variety of different topics. The basic information about each topic is as follows:

Learning & IAG – Including careers advice, people skills, interview techniques, safety at work & the world of work.

Health & Social – Including keeping yourself safe, legal & illegal substances, sexual health, anti-bullying & healthy living.

Citizenship – Including British values, homelessness, charity work, anti-racism, the law & our planet.

Financial awareness – Including managing your money, being enterprising, running your own business, savings and credit.

Year 9 Students also receive extra PSHE sessions, on a rotation basis, during enrichment on Wednesday week1 on the topics of Sex Related Education, homophobic bullying and alcohol/substance misuse.


3. How the course is assessed

There is currently no formal assessment of the PSHE course.

You can download the information about our PHSE course.

For further details please contact Mr Scott

Why study this course?

RE focuses on pupils valuing themselves and others. RE celebrates diversity in society by helping pupils understand similarities and differences. It promotes self-awareness, tolerance, respect, open-mindedness, appreciation and wonder. RE also helps pupils develop key skills such as communication, working with others and problem solving.

What will you study in this course?

Year 10 Core RE

In year 10, Core RE students study a range of moral, contemporary issues and religious attitudes to these issues. Topics studied include:

• Attitudes to the environment and animal rights, examining both Christian and Muslim attitudes to these.

• Wealth and poverty and Christian and Muslim attitudes to helping the less fortunate.

• Abortion, euthanasia, transplant surgery and Christian and Muslim attitudes to them.

• Human Rights, the UDHR and the electoral process in the UK.

How the course is assessed?

Core RE is a non-examination subject. There are no final external examinations being worked towards. RE is delivered because of the statutory legal requirement. Student’s classwork is informally assessed by the subject teacher.

For further information please contact Miss Gannon

1. Why study this course

All pupils in years 9-11 will receive 3 x 1 hour lessons of core PE every cycle. There are 5 guiding principles which drive the delivery of core PE at Astley:

• Developing skills and techniques across a range of physical activities. We aim to allow our pupils to achieve their unique potential within physical activity and sport. Pupils will be guided on how to improve their sporting skills and how to access opportunities outside of the curriculum.

• Developing decision making skills. Pupils are taught how to select and apply a range of skills and tactics, across a range of sporting activities, in order to be successful. Pupils are given the opportunity undertake different roles within lessons (performer, official and coach) and experience the decision making requirements of each, regardless of physical prowess.

• Developing physical and mental capacity. Pupils will be given the opportunity to improve the physical and mental well-being through participation in core PE. Pupils will look at what their own physical strengths and weakness are and be guided on how to improve them. Students will also learn about how behave with respect and tolerance when competing in competitive situations (accept winning and losing in the appropriate manner, accepting referee’s decisions).

• Evaluating and improving performance. Pupils will be taught how to analyse their own performance and describe methods of improvement. Pupils will undertake the role of a coach/manager and endeavour to make improvements to the performance of their team or to a peer’s skill level and/or tactical understanding.

• Making Informed decisions about decisions about healthy active lifestyles. Pupils will be taught about the benefits of following a healthy active lifestyle. Lessons will include opportunities to discuss how the body reacts to exercise and the long term physical gains from regular participation. Pupils will also be taught about the mental and social involvement in sport (stress relieve, anxiety management, social mixing).

2. What you will study in this course 

Activities range from:
• Football
• Netball
• Swimming (stroke and personal survival)
• Dance (including Zumba)
• Badminton 
• Rugby League
• Fitness
• Trampolining
• Basketball
• Table tennis
• Rounders
• Cricket
• Athletics
• Softball
• Tennis
• Multi-sports

3. How the course is assessed
Core PE will be assessed in the following ways:

Year 9
Pupils will be assessed without levels. They will be assessed against set criteria we have developed across our partner Middle Schools.

It will involve being rated as:
• Emerging
• Developing
• Secure
• Mastered

The areas they will be assessed in will be:
• Technique
• Create and Perform
• Competition, Health and Fitness
• Outwitting Opponents
• Character and mind-set

Years 10 and 11

Pupils will be assessed against GCSE PE criteria.

The assessment without levels will filter through to year 10 and 11 as our current year 9 move through school. Then we will only assess GCSE PE students against GCSE PE criteria.

You can download the information about our Core PE course.

For further details please contact Mr Lamb.

Core Examined Subjects

The English department have a policy of inclusion where we believe the study of GCSE Language and Literature is an entitlement for all. We believe that there are many important areas that can be developed alongside the students’ ability to write. This includes an appreciation of life and relationships as well as an analysis of our role in society. These areas are explored through poetry, novels and plays. They are also debated through the study of Language where an analysis of the use of persuasive language and rhetorical techniques develops important life skills for all students.

English is a compulsory subject. By studying this course, students will be supported to gain qualifications which will be recognised by all employers. This course will also prepare students to study English Literature and English Language at a higher level.

The course is organised over the two years during which students complete a range of tasks:

English Language:

  • 19th century non-fiction (unseen)
  • Non-fiction from the 20th or 21st centuries (unseen)
  • Transactional writing
  • Creative writing

English Literature:

  • A Shakespeare play
  • Post 1914 Drama
  • 19th century fiction
  • Poetry

Spoken Language Endorsement:

  • Presenting
  • Listening to questions and responding
  • The use of standard English

Assessment:

All examinations in English Language and Literature are now linear; meaning all external assessments will take place at the end of year 11. Internal assessments will be carried out across the two years to monitor student progress. The GCSE English Language and English Literature specifications will both be assessed using the new 9 - 1 assessment criteria.

English Language:

Two examination papers

Paper 1 (50% of qualification) Two hours

Paper 2 (50% of qualification) Two hours

English Language assesses reading, writing, speaking and listening. (20% of marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar).

 

English Literature:

Two examination papers

Paper 1 (40% Shakespeare and 19th century fiction) One hour 45 minutes

Paper 2 (60% Post 1914 drama and poetry) Two hours 15 minutes

English Literature assesses reading with 5% of the marks being awarded to spelling, punctuation and grammar.

For further information please contact Miss Chadkirk, Head of English Faculty

  • Content is subject to slight changes following endorsement of new specifications

For further information please contact Miss Chadkirk

Our Aims

At Astley Community High School, we aim to develop a positive approach to Mathematics by making it interesting and relevant to students.

Significant changes to the GCSE mathematics syllabus for students sitting examinations from summer 2017 will ensure that students are given opportunities to solve problems independently, and that they will develop their ability to think strategically. In addition to covering the traditional areas of number, algebra, geometry and statistics, GCSE mathematics will be more demanding for everyone:

• The volume of subject content has increased.
• The demand of that content is increasing too, with harder topics being introduced. This is true for both Foundation Tier students and Higher Tier students.
• The total time for the examinations is increasing
• A new grading structure is being introduced, from grade 9 to 1, to replace the familiar A* to G grading system.
• In the assessments there’s a greater emphasis on problem solving andmathematical reasoning, with more marks now being allocated to these higher-order skills
• Students will be required to memorise formulae – fewer formulae will be provided in examinations.

Together these changes are designed to help students emerge from GCSE maths with a level of confidence and fluency that will provide a genuine foundation for the rest of their learning and working lives.

The Course

All students will follow the GCSE linear syllabus at either the Foundation or Higher tier. There is no coursework for GCSE Mathematics. For each tier there are three written examinations each lasting 1 hour and 30 minutes. Students will be allowed the use of a calculator for two of these papers.

In order to ensure that pupil progress is monitored, there are regular progress tests. Pupils will be supported with revision prior to a test and be given the opportunity to revisit problem areas after the test. Pupils will also review previous targets and set new ones for the next half term block. Parents will be informed of results which are significantly below target. Postcards will be issued for pupils who are working above the expected level. Set changes may occur as a result of progress test scores.

Support
Close to the GCSE examination, we will provide additional opportunities for revision. Over the last few years we have successfully used breakfast clubs and crammer sessions. All pupils are issued with practice examination papers, which are marked and graded.

The Mathematics Department subscribes to an excellent website (www.mymaths.co.uk), which may be used for effective independent revision. Students also have access to additional resources via shared files, which include mathswatch tutorials.

It is essential that students are fully equipped for the Mathematics course. All students require a scientific calculator for all lessons and will need a protractor and compasses for the examinations.

We are keen that all pupils make good progress and so we are more than happy to discuss the needs of individual pupils where necessary.

For further information please contact Mrs Ward.

Science is a compulsory subject at GCSE and students can either follow a Combined Science (Dual Award) program, or choose the 3rd Science as one of their option choices, this enables students to study separate GCSE’s in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Combined Science, Biology, Chemistry and Physics all count as part of the Ebacc and are recognised by employers and higher education institutions as important indicators of academic ability.

Combined Science
Students follow the AQA Combined Science Trilogy courses during Year 10 and 11. This consists of units from Biology; Chemistry and Physics, and requires students to take an active part in 16 required practical activities over the two years.

How will I be assessed?
Assessment in Combined Science takes the form of six (1hr 15mins) written papers: two biology, two chemistry and two physics, each paper is worth 16.7% of final mark. Each of the papers will assess knowledge and understanding from distinct topic areas using a mixture of multiple choice, structured, closed short answer, and open response questions.

Triple Science (Biology; Chemistry and Physics)
The Triple Science is available as the option choice 3rd Science. It enables students to gain separate GCSE’s in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
Those that choose to follow the Triple Science route will cover the similar units to those covered in Combined Science but to a greater depth and demand. They also have to take an active part in 8 required practical for per subject studied. Like other option subjects, Biology; Chemistry and Physics are taught over two years and are assessed as separate qualifications at the end of Year 11.

Who should do Triple Science?
If you enjoy Science, and expect to achieve a level 6 or better at the end of KS3, you should seriously consider choosing the Triple Science Option. It will enable you to have a much broader and more in-depth level of scientific knowledge and understanding.
It will also give you a real advantage, should you choose to study Sciences or Associated Subjects at A level (Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Psychology) or if you want to pursue a career within Science and Technology. For the following Career areas it would be an advantage:
• Medicine
• Nursing
• Engineering (Mechanical/Electrical/Chemical)
• Veterinary Work
• Forensic Science
• Physiotherapy
• Pharmaceutical e.g. MSD/ P and G
• Sports Science
• Pathology
• Law
• Research and Development

How will I be assessed?
Assessment in Biology; Chemistry and Physics follow a similar structure with two (1hr 45mins) exams per subject studied each paper worth 50% of the final mark. Each of the papers will assess knowledge and understanding from distinct topic areas using a mixture of multiple choice, structured, closed short answer, and open response questions.

For further information please contact Mr Hiscock or your Science teacher.

Optional Subjects

The GCSE History course contains two different components each with 2 sections. Each component is assessed in one of two exams lasting 1 hour and 45 minutes long each. Both exams will be at the end of year 11 and each is worth 50% of the marks.

Component 1: Understanding the modern world
Section A: Period study: Option 1B Germany 1890-1945: Democracy and Dictatorship
Our Period Study starts with the growth of democracy in Germany before World War One, the rule of Kaiser Wilhelm II, and the naval rivalry with Great Britain. We then examine the impact of fighting and defeat in the Great War upon the German nation and government, exploring key features and characteristics of the period through content
such as the Treaty of Versailles, hyperinflation, and the Great Depression. The final part of the course examines the experience of the German people living under the Nazis and how the Nazis dealt with women, young people, minorities, and the economy. We also look at who opposed the Nazis and what impact did the Second World War have upon Germany. We examine enquiry questions such as: Was the Weimar Republic doomed from the start? How was Hitler able to come to power in Germany? How effectively did the Nazis control Germany 1933-45? What was it like to live in Nazi Germany? The study of Germany at this time reveals one of the darkest and most evil periods in human history and is vital for anyone who wishes to understand the World in which we live in today.

Section B: Wider World depth study: Conflict and tension, 1918–1939
This wider world depth study enables students to understand the complicated world of international relations-what are the diverse interests of different individuals and states? It focuses on the causes of the Second World War and why it proved difficult to resolve the issues which caused it. We start at the end of the First World War with the attempts to make a lasting peace from the ruins of a battered Europe. We examine the Treaty of Versailles, how the different countries involved felt the peace treaty, and how it could be seen as simply a ceasefire for 20 years. We examine the formation of the League of Nations and how it spectacularly failed in its purpose-to keep global peace. Finally, we examine the roles of Hitler, Stalin, and Neville Chamberlain in the outbreak of World War Two.

Component 2: Shaping the Nation.
Section A: Thematic study
Our thematic study will focus on the health of the British people over the last 1000 years. It focuses on understanding the reasons for the changes and continuity that take place over a long period of time as well how quickly or slowly that change happened. We’ll also test if all of the change was for the better. Characters and events such as Hippocrates, Galen, Paré, Harvey, Pasteur, Koch, Nightingale, the Black Death, the discovery of circulation, DNA and the founding of the modern NHS all feature. We will also study the impact of people with wonderfully colourful names and/or spectacular facial hair-Sir Joseph Bazalgette, David Lloyd George, Winston Churchill, and Seebohm Rowntree, as well as simpler names such as John Snow (no, not the Game of Thrones character-much more interesting and influential!)This unit, at times can require a strong stomach, so if you like
blood and guts in your history, this is the topic for you!

Section B: British depth study including the historical environment
This section allows us to study the arrival of the Normans and the impact of their rule on England. It includes 1066 and all that including all the major battles of that year as well as the very brutal methods William the Conqueror used in order to gain control of England. We will also look at what it was like to live under the Normans including the use of the Feudal system and the production of the Domesday Book. The development of the
Norman Church and monasteries are also covered in this section. Within this depth study we will also focus on a specific historical site, named by the exam board, which is worth 10% of the total GCSE. This may be a Cathedral, a monastery or a castle. We will develop an understanding of the key features of buildings of this type and understand what the relationship between the key events and sites were.

Is this the right course for you?
The skills that you will develop through study of GCSE History are highly valued by ALL employers. Skills such as research and problem solving, written and verbal communication, the ability to select the right information to support an argument, and to decide if a source of information is reliable or not are abilities that are key in the 21st century workplace. Furthermore, you will be expected to read and understand a lot of information so it will
further improve your already good literacy skills. Studying GCSE History will prepare you to progress to a wide range of Post 16 courses and will open up career opportunities in journalism, law, teaching, politics, television and media, banking, and archaeology to name but a few.

NB: Content and assessment may be subject to slight changes following endorsement of the new specification.

For further information please speak to Mr McCudden or Miss Chester.

GCSE Geography gives you the opportunity to develop your understanding of physical and human geography. You will also investigate the links between them. Students will travel the world from the classroom, exploring case studies in the United Kingdom (UK), newly emerging economies (NEEs) and lower income countries (LICs). Topics of study include climate change, poverty, deprivation, global shifts in economic power and the challenge of sustainable resource use. You will be encouraged to understand your role in society, by considering different viewpoints, values and attitudes.

Living with the physical environment
• The challenge of natural hazards (tectonic and weather)
• Physical landscapes in the UK (coastal, rivers and glacial landscapes)
• The living world (ecosystems, tropical rainforests and deserts)

Challenges in the human environment
• Urban issues and challenges (cities)
• The changing economic world (economic development)
• The challenge of resource management (food, water and energy)

Geographical applications
• Issue evaluation (human and/or physical geography)
• Fieldwork (human and physical geography)

Geographical skills
• Geographical skills – maps, graphs and data

Assessment (proposed AQA Geography) – students will take all exams at the end of Year 11.

Paper 1 - Living with the physical environment
• 1½ hour exam (35%)

Paper 2 - Challenges in the human environment
• 1½ hour exam (35%)

Paper 3 – Geographical applications: Issue evaluation and fieldwork
• 1 hour exam (30%)

All 3 papers will include the following types of questions - multiple-choice, short answer, levels of response and extended prose.

• Content and assessment may be subject to change following endorsement of new specification.

For further information please contact Mrs Midgley.

 

3rd Science is available as an option choice it enables students to convert the Combine Science units into separate GCSE’s in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Those that choose to follow the Third Science Option will cover many of the same units covered in Combined Science, but to a greater depth.

Biology; Chemistry and Physics all have a minimum of 8 required practical’s, which students are required to take an active part in. Like other option subjects, it is a taught over two years and assessed as separate qualifications at the end of Year 11.

What will I study?

GCSE Biology
Biology is split into eight major topics including: Cell biology; Organisation; Infection and response; Bioenergetics; Homeostasis and response; Inheritance variation and evolution and Ecology.

GCSE Chemistry
Chemistry is split into ten topic areas including: Atomic structure and the periodic table; Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter; Quantitative chemistry; Chemical changes; Energy changes; The rate and extent of chemical change; Organic chemistry; Chemical analysis; Chemistry of the atmosphere and Using resources.

GCSE Physics
Physics is split into eight topic areas including: Forces; Energy; Waves; Electricity; Magnetism and electromagnetism; Particle model of matter; Atomic structure; and Space physics (physics only).

Who should do the Third Science?
If you enjoy Science, and expect to achieve a level 6 or better at the end of KS3, you should seriously consider choosing the Third Science Option. It will enable you to have a much broader and more in-depth appreciation of scientific knowledge and thinking.

It will also give you a real advantage, should you choose to study A level in Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Psychology or if you have aspirations to follow a career within the following STEM or other career areas:

• Medicine
• Nursing
• Engineering (Mechanical/Electrical/Chemical)
• Veterinary Work
• Forensic Science
• Physiotherapy
• Pharmaceutical e.g. MSD/ P and G
• Sports Science
• Pathology
• Law
• Research and Development.

How will it be assessed?
Assessment in Biology; Chemistry and Physics takes the form of two 1hr 45 minute written papers for each Science studied. Both papers make up 50% of the final grade and contain a mix of multiple choice, structured, closed short answer, and open response questions.

For further information please contact Mr Hiscock or your Science teacher.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

It may seem that everyone speaks English, but in fact 75% of the world’s population don’t. Languages are really important in the world we live in, and give you great skills for the rest of your life. Also, GCSE French is fun to learn. You will listen to songs; watch TV, read comics and books, all in French.

The GCSE course in French will concentrate on three themes:

Theme 1 – Identity and culture
Topic 1: Me, my family and friends
Relationships with family and friends, Marriage/partnership
Topic 2: Technology in everyday life
Social media, Mobile technology
Topic 3: Free-time activities
Music, Cinema and TV, Food and eating out, Sport
Topic 4: Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Theme 2 – Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Topic 1: Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Topic 2: Social issues
Charity/voluntary work, Healthy/unhealthy living
Topic 3: Global issues
The environment, Poverty/homelessness
Topic 4: Travel and tourism

Theme 3 – Current and future study and employment
Topic 1: My studies
Topic 2: Life at school/college
Topic 3: Education post-16
Topic 4: Jobs, career choices and ambitions

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments. GCSE French has a Foundation and Higher Tier.

Unit 1 - Listening 25% exam
• multiple choice questions

Unit 2 - Reading 25% exam
• multiple choice and a translation from French into English

Unit 3 - Speaking 25% controlled assessment
• role-play, discussion about photo cards and general conversation

Unit 4 - Writing 25% exam
• translation from English into French, structured writing task or open-ended writing task

For further information please contact Mr Barrett.

 

Why study this course?

• The GCSE in Computing will give students a real in depth understanding of how computer technology works. It offers an insight into what goes on behind the scenes of computer programming which many students find absorbing.

• In addition this course develops a range of critical thinking skills, analysis and problem solving which can be transferred to further learning and to everyday life.

• OCR have also teamed up with partners such as Raspberry Pie and Computing at School to invigorate the curriculum.

Units of study in Year 10 and Year 11

Units  OCR Computing (J275) Assessment Method for one GCSE grade
1  Computer Systems and Programming  A451   1 hour 30 mins written examination 40%
2  Practical Investigation A452  Controlled Assessment set by OCR 30%
3  Programming Project A453  Controlled Assessment set by OCR 30%

What do I need to be able to join the course?

• The course is open to students who we expect to achieve a minimum of a grade C in GCSE Maths. This is due to the technical requirements of computer programming.


How is the course assessed?

• Students will study three units.

• There is one examination totalling 40% of the final grade.

• There are two controlled assessments which make up 60% of the final grade.

 

What styles of teaching and learning will be used?

• A variety of teaching styles will be used to enable you to complete the units.

• You will be expected to work independently and as part of a team at times.

• You will research and learn about computing through possible visits, group work, outside speakers and internet research.


Pathways

• Students who study Computing at GCSE can go on to study ICT in the sixth form at Astley. Many have then gone on to successfully gain ICT places at university before embarking on their own careers.

For further information see your ICT teacher, Mr Jones or Mr Armstrong.

 

Why do you study this course?

• This course has been designed to provide you with the knowledge and understanding of one of the world’s fastest growing industries.

• It will allow you to develop skills in a range of Business areas including Finance and Customer Service.

• It will allow you to progress into employment, further education or onto the Level 3 Business course in the Sixth Form at Astley.

Units you will study in Year 10

Units BTEC First Award Assessment Method
4 Principles of Customer Service Internal (Coursework)
2 Finance for Business Internal (Coursework)

Units you will study in Year 11

Units BTEC First Award Assessment Method
3 Promoting a Brand Internal (Coursework)
1 Enterprise in the Business World External (Examination)

Who will do the course?

• The BTEC Level 2 Business course is open to all students. 

How is the course assessed?

• There are three units in Year 10 and 11 which will be assessed using coursework projects. These will be marked in school by your teacher and moderated by the examination board.

• There is one online examination in Year 11 which is worth 25% of your overall grade.

• The course is equivalent to one GCSE grade A* to C but marked as a BTEC Pass, Merit, Distinction or Distinction Star.

What styles of teaching and learning will be used?

• A variety of styles will be used to enable you to complete the course. You will research the Business industry through group work, individual assessment, the internet and teacher led activities.

For further information see Mr Gilhooley, Mrs Clennell or Mr Armstrong.

Why do you study this course?

• You will learn how travel and tourism is now one of the largest sectors in the world in terms of generating jobs and income.

• It is a dynamic and vibrant sector which makes a major contribution to the UK economy.

• You will develop your skills so you can progress to a level 3 course.

• Visits to travel destinations will to be arranged.

 

Units you will study in Year 10

Units BTEC First Award Assessment Method
2 UK Travel and Tourism Destinations  Internal (Coursework)
3 The Development of Travel and Tourism in the UK  Internal (Coursework)

 

Units you will study in Year 11

Units  BTEC First Award Assessment Method
 6  The Travel and Tourism Customer Experience  Internal (Coursework)
 1  The UK Travel and Tourism Sector  External (Examination)

 

Who will do the course?

• The BTEC Travel and Tourism course is open to all students.

How is the course assessed?

• There are three units in year 10 and 11 which will be assessed using coursework projects. These will be marked in school by your teacher and moderated by the examination board.

• There is one external examination in year 11 which is worth 25% of your overall grade.

• The course is equivalent to one GCSE grade A* to C but marked as a BTEC Pass, Merit, Distinction or Distinction Star.

What styles of teaching and learning will be used?

• A variety of styles will be used to enable you to complete the course. You will research the Travel and Tourism industry through group work, individual assessment, the internet and teacher led activities.

For further information see Mr Armstrong or Mr Gilhooley.

Why do you study this course?

• This course has been designed to provide you with the knowledge and understanding of one of the world’s fastest growing industries.

• It will allow you to develop skills in a range of software packages and develop your understanding of the ICT industry.

• It will allow you to progress into employment, further education or onto the Level 3 ICT course in the sixth form at Astley.

Units you will study in Year 10

Units BTEC First Award Assessment Method
6 Creating Digital Graphics Internal (Coursework)
9 Spreadsheet Development Internal (Coursework)

 

Units you will study in Year 11

Units BTEC First Award Assessment Method
3 A Digital Portfolio Internal (Coursework)
1 Spreadsheet Development External (Coursework)

 

Who will do the course?

• The BTEC Information and Creative Technology course is open to all students.


How is the course assessed?

• There are three units in year 10 and 11 which will be assessed using coursework projects. These will be marked in school by your teacher and moderated by the examination board.

• There is one online examination in year 11 which is worth 25% of your overall grade.

• The course is equivalent to one GCSE grade A* to C but marked as a BTEC Pass, Merit, Distinction or Distinction Star.


What styles of teaching and learning will be used?

• A variety of styles will be used to enable you to complete the course. You will research the ICT industry through group work, individual assessment, the internet and teacher led activities.

For further information see your ICT teacher or Mr Armstrong.

 

This course follows the examination board AQA.

The subject is followed by students throughout Years 10 and 11 leading to a full GCSE. The course allows all students to demonstrate attainment irrespective of whether or not they believe in God, and regardless of their gender and ethnic or social background. Students will gain an appreciation of how religion, philosophy and ethics form the basis of our culture. They will develop analytical and critical thinking skills as well as the ability to work with abstract ideas, leadership and research skills.

Course content
The course is composed of TWO compulsory components.

Component 1: The study of beliefs, teachings and practices within Christianity AND Islam.
Christianity - Beliefs and teachings about:
• The nature of God
• Creation
• Resurrection and the afterlife
• Jesus as the Son of God
• Crucifixion, resurrection and ascension of Jesus.
• Sin, salvation, grace and spirit
• Atonement.

Christianity - Practices:
• Worship and festivals
• Liturgical and non-liturgical worship
• Prayer, formal and informal
• The role and meaning of the sacraments
• The importance of pilgrimage
• The celebrations of Christmas and Easter
• The role of the church in the wider community.

Islam - Beliefs and teachings about:
• The oneness of God
• The nature of God
• Angels
• Predestination and the afterlife
• Resurrection heaven and hell.
• Prophet hood
• The holy books

Islam - Practices:
• Worship – five pillars of Sunni Islam and the Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam.
• Prayer and its importance
• Fasting
• Giving to charity
• Pilgrimage
• Festivals and commemorations.

Component 2: Thematic studies. The study of four religious, philosophical and ethical themes from the following 6:
• Theme A: Relationships and families.
• Theme B: Religion and life
• Theme C: The existence of God and revelation
• Theme D: Religion, peace and conflict
• Theme E: Religion, crime and punishment
• Theme F: Religion, human rights and social justice.

In relation to the four themes chosen, students will apply Christian AND Muslim teachings to these themes.

Assessment (proposed)
This is a linear course and students sit two examinations in the summer term of Year 11.
The course DOES NOT include a controlled assessment element.

Component 1 examination:
• Written examination 1hour 45 minutes.
• 50% of the GCSE
Component 2 examination:
• Written examination 1hour 45 minutes.
• 50% of the GCSE

For further information please contact Miss Gannon.

Why Study Physical Education

Do you like PE and sport?  Do you like learning new sports?  Would you like to be rewarded for playing the sports you enjoy?  Would you like to study PE and sport?  If you have answered YES to these questions, then you will enjoy GCSE Physical Education.

GCSE Physical Education consists of both practical and theory-based lessons.  Theory lessons are classroom based and involve writing, discussion and homework.  Theory work is assessed through written examinations and is worth 60% of the final grade.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Develop and apply advanced skills and techniques in a variety of sports
  • Select and apply advanced skills, tactics, strategies and team skills
  • Evaluate and improve sporting performance

Coursework (Practical):

This will be 40% of your overall result.  You will be assessed in individual and team activities, these include (but not limited to): football, dance, rugby league, rugby union, golf, athletics, badminton, trampolining and netball.  You will also be tested on your ability to analyse a person’s sporting performance.

Those pupils who participate in activities outside of school can be assessed by either a coach or teacher, improving their chance of gaining higher grades.  Examples of this include Karate, Hockey and Horse-riding.

2 Written Papers (1 hr 45 and 1 hr 15):     

Both papers will be have multiple-choice, short and extended answer questions.

The content you will cover:

  • Anatomy and physiology
  • Sports psychology
  • Physical training
  • Movement analysis

Summary

5 lessons over the two-week timetable consisting of 3 classroom-based and 2 practical lessons.

40% Practical coursework.

60% Written in the form of written examinations.

For further information please contact Mr Lamb.

This BTEC provides a vocationally related qualification and is completed over a two year period. The BTEC Level 2 Award in Children’s Play, Learning and Development is equivalent to one GCSE.

The qualification inspires and enthuses learners to consider a career in early years, or related sectors. A range of teaching, learning and assessment styles are used to enable and motivate students to achieve the best they can.

What will you study?

• 3 compulsory units

UNIT 1: PATTERNS OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT (This unit is assessed through a 60 minute exam)
This unit explores:
• Growth and development in children
• The characteristics of children’s development from birth to eight years
• How adults in early years settings can support children’s development

UNIT 2: PROMOTING CHILDREN’S DEVELOPMENT THROUGH PLAY (This unit is assessed through an assignment)
This unit explores:
• How play promotes children’s development in early years settings
• How different play opportunities promote children’s development
• How play is structured in early years settings to promote children’s development

UNIT 3: THE PRINCIPLES OF EARLY YEARS PRACTICE (This unit is assessed through an assignment)
This unit explores:
• The importance of inclusive practice in early years
• Ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice
• How children are empowered in early years settings
• The importance of the key person approach in supporting children’s development

Progression
This course supports progression into Further Education, GCE AS and A2, BTEC Level 3 courses and further training
for employment opportunities (e.g. NVQs in Child Care).

For further information please contact Mr Lamb or Miss Bell.

This BTEC provides a vocationally related qualification and is completed over a two year period. The BTEC Level 2 Award in Health and Social Care is equivalent to one GCSE.

The qualification introduces students to work-related learning and provides a comprehensive view of the Health and Social Care sector. A range of teaching, learning and assessment styles are used to enable and motivate students to achieve the best they can.

What will you study?

• 2 compulsory units
• 2 optional units

UNIT 1: HUMAN LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT (This unit is assessed through a 60 minute exam)
This unit explores:
• Human growth and development Across life stages
• Factors affecting human growth and development and how they are interrelated.

UNIT 2: HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE VALUES (This unit is assessed through an assignment)
This unit explores:
• The care values that underpin current practice in health and social care
• Ways of empowering individuals who use health and social care services

Optional units (you will study 2 of these). All of these units are assessed through assignments.

• Unit 3 – Effective Communication in Health and Social Care
• Unit 4 – Social Influences on Health and Wellbeing
• Unit 5 – Promoting Health and Wellbeing
• Unit 6 – The Impact of Nutrition on Health and Wellbeing
• Unit 7 – Equality and Diversity in Health and Social Care
• Unit 8 – Individual Rights in Health and Social Care

Progression
This course supports progression into Further Education, GCE AS and A2, BTEC Level 3 courses and further training for employment opportunities (e.g. NVQs in Health, Social Care and Early Years).

For further information please contact Mr Lamb or Miss Bell.

 

This GCSE explores the key areas of nutrition, diet and health, including food hygiene and safety, food storage, food preparation and cooking. It aims to teach them how to grow and cook food from scratch as well as preparing them for careers in the food industry.

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition is made up of three mandatory elements.

The Food Investigation Assessment – practical experimentation
15% of the total marks are from tasks which assess the scientific principles underlying the preparation and cooking of food: carbohydrates, fats/oils, protein, fruit and vegetables.

Assessment
Controlled assessment tasks will be in the form of a written report which should include photographs which support the investigation. Assessment completed in Year 10.

The Food Preparation Assessment
35% of the total marks are from tasks which assess the planning, preparation and presentation of food.

The candidate will be required to:

  • Prepare, cook and present a menu of 3 dishes within a single period of no more than 3 hours.
  • Plan in advance how this will be achieved.

Candidates submit one Food Preparation task using a themes provided by OCR. Assessment completed in Year 11.

Assessment
The evidence required will be in the form of photographs or visual recordings which show technical skills and final dishes and written work which explains how the student has designed, executed and evaluated the preparation, cooking and presentation of the 3 dishes.

Written Examination
Students learn about the following topics through practical activities.

Component title Component overview                          
A. Nutrition

Students develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical processes as well as the nutritional content of food and drinks.

B. Food: Food provenance, Food choice

Students understand the economic, environmental, ethical, and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, and diet and health choices.

 

 C. Cooking and food preparation Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing and serving food. 

 D. Skill requirements: preparation and cooking techniques

Students demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills by planning, preparing and cooking using a variety of food commodities, cooking techniques and equipment. 

Students understand and explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions (traditional, British and international), to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes.

Assessment
1 hour 30 minutes written paper at the end of Year 11. Worth 100 marks and 50% of the total GCSE marks.

Building on what you have learned in Art and Design in Year 9 the course gives you the skills you need to produce innovative, creative art and design across a range of disciplines.

You will be given the opportunity to develop a range of artistic skills and demonstrate these by creatively manipulating a broad range of materials and processes.  Students will have opportunities to work with a range of other disciplines which will include working with:

  • Fine Art - painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture        
  • Fashion / Textiles
  • Graphic Design
  • Photographic / Digital imaging

You will gain experience of working in all of these areas through the beginning of the course but may choose to specialise in one area in Year 11 if you wish to.

In the projects you work through you will use the world around you for inspiration for your ideas and a range of methods including photography can be used to record sources of inspiration.  You will also study cultural influences on art and design as well as the work of professional artists, designers and crafts people.  Ideas will be recorded and developed through a range of methods. Experimentation with materials and processes and creativity is key.

The course is split into two units:

Unit 1: This is the coursework unit in which all project work from Years 10 and 11 is marked as a whole.

Unit 2: This is an externally set assignment which begins in the January of Year 11. Students chose a theme or brief from a choice set by the exam board.  This project then follows the structure of the coursework projects but has a time limit and must have an   outcome generated during a period of controlled assessment.

Both units are assessed on the same criteria which assess your ability to:

  • Understand art and design by analysing the work of designers and crafts people from a range of cultures and historical periods and apply this knowledge when developing your own work.
  • Experiment with ideas, materials, and processes.
  • Record ideas and sources of inspiration in a range of appropriate methods.
  • Produce final outcomes, realising intentions making connections with the work of designers and crafts people studied.

If you have any questions about this course see Mr Jones

Building on what you have learned in both Art and Design and Design Technology in Year 9 the 3D Design course gives you the skills you need to produce innovative, creative and well constructed 3 dimensional products.

You will be given the opportunity to develop a range of 3D making skills and demonstrate these by creatively manipulating a broad range of materials and processes.   Working with wood as the principle material through basic carpentry methods, turning, carving, etc will be one of the broadest elements of the course but students will also have opportunities to work with a range of other disciplines if they choose to.

These will include working with:

  • Finishing techniques such as painting, stencilling, distressing, varnishing etc.
  • Working with paper and card through concept modelling.
  • Ceramics through tiling, modelling, throwing and glazing.
  • Textiles through upholstering, dyeing, leatherworking, printing etc.
  • Stained Glass.
  • Jewellery.

Some of these media areas will be offered as part of the course whilst others will be offered as extracurricular after school classes.  Skills learned in these areas can be used to enhance wood based products or to develop outcomes in their own right.

In the projects you work through you will use the world around you for inspiration for your ideas and a range of methods including photography can be used to record sources of inspiration.  You will also study cultural influences on 3D design as well as the work of professional designers and makers.  Ideas will be recorded and developed through a range of taught drawing skills from simple thumbnail sketches to more complex technical drawing and digital design methods.  Experimentation with materials and processes and creativity is key.

The course is split into two units. Unit 1 is the coursework unit in which all project work from years 10 and 11 is marked as a whole. Unit 2 is an externally set assignment which begins in the January of year 11. Students respond to a theme set by the exam board but which will have a number of suggested starting points one of which the students must chose. This project then follows the structure of the coursework projects but has a time limit and must have an outcome generated during a period of controlled assessment.

Both units are assessed separately but marked against the same criteria which assess your ability to:

  • Understand 3D design by analysing the work of designers and crafts people from a range of cultures and historical periods and apply this knowledge when developing your own work.
  • Experiment with ideas, materials, and processes.
  • Record ideas and sources of inspiration in a range of appropriate methods.
  • Produce final outcomes and products, realising intentions making connections with the work of designers and crafts people studied.

If you have any questions about this course see Mr Jones

Astley Community High School | Elsdon Avenue | Seaton Delaval | Northumberland | NE25 0BP
T: 0191 237 1505 E: reception@astleyhigh.org