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Year 11 Curriculum 2015-2016

Introduction to Year 11

 

Year 11 at Astley sees the continuation of the Key Stage 4 courses started in Year 10 and in some cases, Year 9. Some courses finish before the end of Y11. Where this happens students may start a module of the corresponding A-level course (as in Maths), revisit earlier work to boost their overall grade (as in BTEC subjects) or use the free time to prepare for examinations in their other subjects.
Our Key Stage 4 Booklet contains all of the curriculum information for current Year 11 students. Please contact us if you require a printed copy.

 

Core Non-Examined Subjects

1. Why study this course?

All students will cover a PSHE programme that aims to:

• Promote their spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development 
• Prepare them for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life and ensure they are prepared to take their place in society.

As a result of the work we do with students, it is our expectation that will they become well-rounded citizens and responsible members of the communities in which they live. In addition, we are committed to equipping them with the skills required to succeed in modern Britain.

2. What students will study during this course

Our programme of study is based around a fortnightly PSHE lesson. This is complemented by RE lessons, year group assemblies, cross-curricular work, intervention activities, enrichment courses and drop in sessions. We also have a network of agencies that support students both inside and outside of school.

We use PSHE education to build on the statutory content already outlined in the national curriculum, the basic school curriculum and in statutory guidance on: drug education, financial education, sex and relationship education (SRE) and the importance of physical activity and diet for a healthy lifestyle.

We will deliver 4 key units to students which include a variety of different topics. The basic information about each topic is as follows:

Learning & IAG – Including careers advice, people skills, interview techniques, safety at work & the world of work.

Health & Social – Including keeping yourself safe, legal & illegal substances, sexual health, anti-bullying & healthy living.

Citizenship – Including British values, homelessness, charity work, anti-racism, the law & our planet.

Financial awareness – Including managing your money, being enterprising, running your own business, savings and credit.

Year 9 Students also receive extra PSHE sessions, on a rotation basis, during enrichment on Wednesday week1 on the topics of Sex Related Education, homophobic bullying and alcohol/substance misuse.


3. How the course is assessed

There is currently no formal assessment of the PSHE course.

For further details please contact Mr Scott.

Why study this course?

RE focuses on pupils valuing themselves and others. RE celebrates diversity in society by helping pupils understand similarities and differences. It promotes self-awareness, tolerance, respect, open-mindedness, appreciation and wonder. RE also helps pupils develop key skills such as communication, working with others and problem solving.

What will you study in this course?

Year 11 Core RE
Year 11 Core RE continues to explore further moral issues. They begin with looking at a unit of crime and punishment. This unit covers:

• The importance of justice.

• Theories of punishment and the importance of laws.

• Christian and Muslim attitudes to punishment and justice.

This is followed by the examination of a unit of work about conflict and peace, the work of peace organisations. Students look at Christian and Muslim attitudes to forgiveness and reconciliation.

Finally students examine a short unit on relationships and religious attitudes to various aspects of human relationships.

How the course is assessed?

Core RE is a non-examination subject. There are no final external examinations being worked towards. RE is delivered because of the statutory legal requirement. Student’s classwork is informally assessed by the subject teacher.

For further information please contact Miss Gannon

1. Why study this course

All pupils in years 9-11 will receive 3 x 1 hour lessons of core PE every cycle. There are 5 guiding principles which drive the delivery of core PE at Astley:

• Developing skills and techniques across a range of physical activities. We aim to allow our pupils to achieve their unique potential within physical activity and sport. Pupils will be guided on how to improve their sporting skills and how to access opportunities outside of the curriculum.

• Developing decision making skills. Pupils are taught how to select and apply a range of skills and tactics, across a range of sporting activities, in order to be successful. Pupils are given the opportunity undertake different roles within lessons (performer, official and coach) and experience the decision making requirements of each, regardless of physical prowess.

• Developing physical and mental capacity. Pupils will be given the opportunity to improve the physical and mental well-being through participation in core PE. Pupils will look at what their own physical strengths and weakness are and be guided on how to improve them. Students will also learn about how behave with respect and tolerance when competing in competitive situations (accept winning and losing in the appropriate manner, accepting referee’s decisions).

• Evaluating and improving performance. Pupils will be taught how to analyse their own performance and describe methods of improvement. Pupils will undertake the role of a coach/manager and endeavour to make improvements to the performance of their team or to a peer’s skill level and/or tactical understanding.

• Making Informed decisions about decisions about healthy active lifestyles. Pupils will be taught about the benefits of following a healthy active lifestyle. Lessons will include opportunities to discuss how the body reacts to exercise and the long term physical gains from regular participation. Pupils will also be taught about the mental and social involvement in sport (stress relieve, anxiety management, social mixing).

2. What you will study in this course 

Activities range from:
• Football
• Netball
• Swimming (stroke and personal survival)
• Dance (including Zumba)
• Badminton 
• Rugby League
• Fitness
• Trampolining
• Basketball
• Table tennis
• Rounders
• Cricket
• Athletics
• Softball
• Tennis
• Multi-sports

3. How the course is assessed
Core PE will be assessed in the following ways:

Year 9
Pupils will be assessed without levels. They will be assessed against set criteria we have developed across our partner Middle Schools.

It will involve being rated as:
• Emerging
• Developing
• Secure
• Mastered

The areas they will be assessed in will be:
• Technique
• Create and Perform
• Competition, Health and Fitness
• Outwitting Opponents
• Character and mind-set

Years 10 and 11

Pupils will be assessed against GCSE PE criteria.

The assessment without levels will filter through to year 10 and 11 as our current year 9 move through school. Then we will only assess GCSE PE students against GCSE PE criteria.

For further details please contact Mr Lamb.

Core Examined Subjects

The English department have a policy of inclusion where we believe the study of GCSE Language and Literature is an entitlement for all. We believe that there are many important areas that can be developed alongside the students’ ability to write.  This includes an appreciation of life and relationships as well as an analysis of our role in society.  These areas are explored through poetry, novels and plays.  They are also debated through the study of Language where an analysis of the use of persuasive language and rhetorical techniques develops important life skills for all students.

English is a compulsory subject.  By studying this course, students will be supported to gain qualifications which will be recognised by all employers.  This course will also prepare students to study English Literature and English Language at a higher level.

The course is organised over the two years during which students complete controlled assessments and examinations for both English Language and Literature.

Examinations:

iGCSE English Language

Our current Year 11 students study Cambridge iGCSE English Language.

Overview 
Written exam (40%)
Paper 1: Reading Passages (Core) 1 hour 45 minutes
OR
Paper 2: Reading Passages (Extended) 2 hours

Plus

Coursework Portfolio (40%)
All candidates submit three assignments, each of 500-800 words.

Speaking and Listening (20%)
Approximately 10-12 minutes.
Individual task and discussion.

Edexcel GCSE Certificate in English Literature

Paper 1: Prose and drama (60%)
- Of Mice and Men
- An Inspector Calls
1 hour 30 minutes exam

Paper 2: Poetry (40%)
- Anthology
- Unseen
1 hour 45 minutes exam

 

 

 

For further information please contact Miss Chadkirk

Our Aims

Astley Community High School has been awarded Specialist School Status in Mathematics and Computing. We have high standards in the Mathematics Department and a consistent record of strong examination results. We aim to develop a positive approach to Mathematics by making it interesting and relevant to students.

Changes to the GCSE syllabus have ensured that our students are given opportunities to solve problems independently, and that they develop their ability to think strategically. In addition to covering the traditional areas of number, algebra, geometry and statistics, there is now a greater focus on relating Mathematics to real world problems. This functional approach is exciting for students and teachers alike.

The Course

The GCSE course allows pupils to develop mathematical skills in four key areas: Number, Algebra, Shape and Statistics.

Fast track students will have started GCSE in September of year 9. They will complete the GCSE course in June of year 10 or November of year 11.

All other students will follow the GCSE linear syllabus at either the Foundation or Higher tier. There is no coursework for GCSE Mathematics. For each tier there are two written examinations.

In order to ensure that pupil progress is monitored, there are regular progress tests. Pupils will be supported with revision prior to a test and be given the opportunity to revisit problem areas after the test. Pupils will also review previous targets and set new ones for the next half term block. Parents will be informed results which are significantly below target. Postcards will be issued for pupils who are working above the expected level. Set changes may occur as a result of progress test scores.

Support

Close to the GCSE examination, we will provide additional opportunities for revision. Over the last few years we have successfully used breakfast clubs and crammer sessions. All pupils are issued with practice examination papers, which are marked and graded.

The Mathematics Department subscribes to an excellent website (www.mymaths.co.uk), which may be used for effective independent revision. Students also have access to additional resources via shared files, which include mathswatch tutorials.

It is essential that students are fully equipped for the Mathematics course. They require a scientific calculator for all lessons and will need a protractor and compasses for the examinations.

We are keen that all pupils make good progress and so we are more than happy to discuss the needs of individual pupils where necessary.

 

For further information please contact Mrs Ward

Science is a compulsory subject at GCSE and students can either follow a Dual Award (Core and Additional Science) program, or choose Science as one of their option choices. This will enable them to convert the Core and Additional Science content into separate Science GCSE’s in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Both Core and Additional Science count as part of the Ebacc subjects and are recognised by employers and higher education institutions as important indicators academic ability.

Core Science (Science A) 
All students follow the AQA Science A course during Year 10. This consists of units from Biology; Chemistry and Physics (Units B1, C1 and P1).

Additional Science
Students who have completed the Core Science units in Year 10, will progress onto three further units from Biology; Chemistry and Physics (B2, C2 and P2) and sit these units at the end of Year 11 along with the units for Core Science. This gives students two GCSE’s one in Core Science and the other in Additional Science.

How will I be assessed?
Assessment in Core and Additional Science take the form of one written paper per unit studied of Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

• Each unit will be assessed by one short answer test lasting 60 minutes each. These tests are taken in May/June of Year 11. These three tests contribute 75% of the final mark for Core Science and Additional Science.

• The remaining 25% of the final grade comes from one Centre Assessed Units (ISA) which is based on practical activities, involving some planning, practical and examined tasks under controlled conditions within Science lessons.

For Further Information contact Mr Hiscock or your Science teacher.

 

Triple Science (Biology; Chemistry and Physics)

The Triple Science is available as an option choice. It enables students to convert the Core and Additional Science units into separate GCSE’s in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Those that choose to follow the Triple Science route will cover the same six units covered in Core and Additional Science, plus three additional units from Biology; Chemistry and Physics (B3; C3 and P3). Like other option subjects, it is a taught over two years and assessed as separate qualifications at the end of year 11.

Who should do the Triple Science?

If you enjoy Science, and expect to achieve a level 6 or better at the end of KS3, you should seriously consider choosing the Triple Science Option. It will enable you to have a much broader and more in-depth level of scientific knowledge and understanding.

It will also give you a real advantage, should you choose to study Sciences or Associated Subjects at A level (Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Psychology) or if you want to pursue a career within Science and Technology. It would be a real advantage in the following career areas:

• Medicine
• Nursing
• Engineering (Mechanical/Electrical/Chemical) 
• Veterinary Work
• Forensic Science
• Physiotherapy
• Pharmaceutical e.g. MSD/ P and G
• Sports Science
• Pathology
• Law
• Research and Development

How will be assessed?
Assessment in Science takes the form of three 60 minute written papers for each Science studied. These make up 75% of the final grade.

The other 25% of the final grade comes from one Centre Assessed Units (ISA) which is based on practical activities, involving some planning, practical and examined tasks under controlled conditions within Science lessons.

For further information please contact Mr Hiscock or your Science teacher.

Why do you study this course?

  • This course has been designed to provide you with the knowledge and understanding of one of the world’s fastest growing industries.
  • It will allow you to develop skills in a range of software packages and develop your understanding of the ICT industry.
  • It will allow you to progress into employment, further education or onto the Level 3 ICT course in the sixth form at Astley.

Unit you will study in Year 9

6 Units - Creating Digital Graphics (BTEC First Award) - Internal (Coursework)

Units you will study in Year 10

9 Units - Spreadsheet Development or Mobile Apps Development (BTEC First Award) - Internal (Coursework)
3 Units - A Digital Portfolio (BTEC First Award) - Internal (Coursework)

Unit you will study in Year 11

1 Units - The Online World (BTEC First Award) - External (Examination)

Who will do the course?

  • As a core subject all pupils in the year group will do this course. They will have the potential to gain the equivalent to A* to C grades at GCSE.

 How is the course assessed?

  • There are three units which will be assessed using coursework projects. These will be marked in school by your teacher and moderated by the examination board.
  • There is one online examination which is worth 25% of your overall grade.
  • The course is equivalent to one GCSE grade A* to C.

What styles of teaching and learning will be used?

  • A variety of styles will be used to enable you to complete the course. You will research the ICT industry through group work, individual assessment, the internet and teacher led activities.

For further information see your ICT teacher or Mr Armstrong

Optional Subjects

Please choose 3 to study plus 2 reserve choices. The PATHWAY form can be downloaded here.

The GCSE History course contains three different units on three different topics. Two of these topics are examined (worth 75% of the marks) whilst one is used for the Controlled Assessment (worth 25% of the marks).

Unit One Modern World Study Controlled Assessment-25% of the marks
This task will be based on the study of a current problem or issue in its historical context. It will involve historical enquiry and students will use and evaluate a range of historical sources in their context to reach reasoned conclusions. We study the position of African Americans in modern society and the continued issue of race relations that continue to trouble American people. We trace history of the Civil Rights movement from slavery through World War One and World War Two to the role of individuals such as Martin Luther King and Malcom X.

Unit Two Study in Depth and Study in Development-45% of the marks
Our Study in Development looks at Medicine through Time and the changes and continuity that take place over a long period of time. We examine what caused people to be healthy or unhealthy, who provided the medical care, why and how did diagnoses and treatments change, what influence did new ideas have, and many other key issues. In terms of topics, we go back to prehistoric medicine, the ancient world of Egypt, Greece, and Rome, through the Middle Ages, and right up to the present day. Characters and events such as Hippocrates, Galen, Pare, Harvey, Pasteur, Koch, Nightingale, the Black Death, the discovery of circulation, DNA and the founding of the modern NHS all feature. This unit, at times can require a strong stomach, so if you like blood and guts in your history, this is the topic for you!

Our Study in Depth focuses on Germany 1919-45. We look at the reasons for the development of totalitarianism in Germany and the impact this had on the people. We explore the key features and characteristics of the period through content such as the Treaty of Versailles, hyperinflation, the Great Depression, the Nazi treatment of young people, women and minority groups, and the impact World War Two had on the regime. We examine enquiry questions such as: Was the Weimar Republic doomed from the start? How was Hitler able to come to power in Germany? How effectively did the Nazis control Germany 1933-45? What was it like to live in Nazi Germany? The study of Germany at this time reveals one of the darkest and most evil periods in human history and is vital for anyone who wishes to understand the World in which we live in today.

Unit 3 Historical Source Investigation-30% of the marks
Our final unit complements well with our previous unit on Medicine through time as we study Public Health in Britain 1800-1914 with a focus on the source skills. This fascinating area of study looks at the causes, pace, effectiveness, significance, and opposition to public health reform in Britain. We look at the poor conditions in towns and cities as the Industrial Revolution took hold in Great Britain. We study the impact of people with wonderfully colourful names and/or spectacular facial hair-Sir Joseph Bazalgette, David Lloyd George, Winston Churchill, and Seebohm Rowntree, as well as simpler names such as John Snow (no, not the Game of Thrones character-much more interesting and influential!)

Is this the right course for you?
The skills that you will develop through study of GCSE History are highly valued by ALL employers. Skills such as research and problem solving, written and verbal communication, the ability to select the right information to support an argument, and to decide if a source of information is reliable or not are abilities that are key in the 21st century workplace. Furthermore, you will be expected to read and understand a lot of information so it will further improve your already good literacy skills. Studying GCSE History will prepare you to progress to a wide range of Post 16 courses and will open up career opportunities in journalism, law, teaching, politics, television and media, banking, and archaeology to name but a few.

For further information please speak to Mr McCudden or Miss Chester.

GCSE Geography will give you the opportunity to develop your understanding of the wider world.  We will look at geographical issues and challenges of local, national and global importance, and their future management.  It will give you useful preparation for understanding the world in which you will work and live.

You will study Physical and Human Geography.

Unit 1 - Managing Places in the 21st Century

  • The Coastal Environment
  • The Urban Environment

Unit 2 - Hostile World & Investigating the Shrinking World

  • Living with Natural Hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, tropical storms and wildfires)
  • Global tourism

Unit 3 – Local Investigation including Fieldwork and Geographical   Issue Investigation

GCSE Geography will give you the opportunity to develop:

  • communication skills
  • technological skills, including ICT
  • graphical and cartographical skills
  • interpersonal skills through debate and discussion
  • problem-solving skills
  • research skills


ASSESSMENT (AQA GEOGRAPHY SPECIFICATION B)

Unit 1 – Managing Places in the 21st century

  • 1½ hour exam (37.5%)

Unit 2 – Hostile World & Investigating the Shrinking World

  • 1½ hour exam (37.5%)

Unit 3 – Controlled Assessments

  • Task 1: Local investigation including fieldwork (15%)
  • Task 2: Geographical issue investigation (10%)

For further information please contact Mrs Midgley

This course covers much of the subject content identified within Northumberland SACRE’S Agreed Syllabus.

The subject is followed by students throughout Years 10 and 11 leading to a full GCSE.  The course allows all students to demonstrate attainment irrespective of whether or not they believe in God, and regardless of  their gender and ethnic or social background.  The course also covers several of the statutory elements of Citizenship Education.

SUMMARY OF AIMS

  • Knowledge and understanding of the beliefs, values and traditions of Christianity and other religions.
  • Consideration of religious and non-religious responses to moral issues.
  • Identification and response to fundamental questions of life raised by religion and human experience. 

 Students are encouraged to formulate their own point of view.

COURSE CONTENT

  • Believing in God
  • Matters of Life and Death
  • Marriage and the Family
  • Religion and Community Cohesion
  • Rights and Responsibilities
  • Environmental and Medical Issues
  • Peace and Conflict
  • Crime and Punishment

ASSESSMENT

This is a modular course and students sit one examination in the summer term of Year 10 and the second examination in the summer term of Year 11.

2 external examinations (1½ hours each)

Students have some flexibility in that there is a choice of questions in the examination.  Religious Studies papers are not tiered and give access to the full range of grades A*-G.

For further information please contact Miss Gannon

The 3rd Science is available as an option choice. It enables students to convert the Core and Additional Science units into separate GCSE’s in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Those that choose to follow the Triple Science route will cover the same six units covered in Core and Additional Science, plus three additional units from Biology; Chemistry and Physics (B3; C3 and P3). Like other option subjects, it is a taught over two years and assessed as separate qualifications at the end of year 11.

Who should do the Three Sciences?

If you enjoy Science, and expect to achieve a level 6 or better at the end of KS3, you should seriously consider choosing the Triple Science Option. It will enable you to have a much broader and more in-depth level of scientific knowledge and understanding.

It will also give you a real advantage, should you choose to study Sciences or Associated Subjects at A level (Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Psychology) or if you want to pursue a career within Science and Technology. It would be a real advantage in the following career areas;

  • Medicine
  • Nursing
  • Engineering (Mechanical/Electrical/Chemical)
  • Veterinary Work
  • Forensic Science
  • Physiotherapy
  • Pharmaceutical e.g. MSD/ P and G
  • Sports Science
  • Pathology
  • Law
  • Research and Development

How will it be assessed?

Assessment in Science takes the form of three 60 minute written papers for each Science studied. These make up 75% of the final grade.

The other 25% of the final grade comes from one Centre Assessed Units (ISA) which is based on practical activities, involving some planning, practical and examined tasks under controlled conditions within Science lessons.

For further information please contact Mr Hiscock or your Science teacher.

The GCSE full course in French will concentrate on the four National Curriculum themes:

  • Lifestyle
  • Leisure
  • Home and Environment
  • Work and Education

For students who have an aptitude for languages, there will be the possibility to take French up to GCSE.  Language teachers will advise whether this is viable for each student. 

During the course, students will concentrate on the four areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing.  At the end of the two-year course, the skills developed in these areas will be tested either at Foundation or Higher Level in Listening and Reading examinations, while the Speaking and Writing aspects will have controlled assessments.

The skill areas are weighted as follows:

  • Listening 20%
  • Reading 20%
  • Speaking 30%
  • Writing 30%

Throughout the two-year course, students’ progress will be monitored by regular completion of reviews and assessment tasks.

Pen Friends and Visits Abroad
Students will be given the opportunity to write to a pen-friend in France and to visit France.

For further information please contact Mr Barrett

Why Study Physical Education?

Do you like PE and sport?  Do you like learning new sports?  Would you like to be rewarded for playing the sports you enjoy?  Would you like to study PE and sport?  If you have answered YES to these questions, then you will enjoy GCSE Physical Education.

GCSE Physical Education consists of both practical and theory-based lessons.  Theory lessons are classroom based and involve writing, discussion and homework.  Theory work is assessed through written examinations and is worth 40% of the final grade.

You Will Learn To:

  • Develop and apply advanced skills and techniques in a variety of sports
  • Select and apply advanced skills, tactics, strategies and team skills
  • Evaluate and improve lifestyle/performance
  • Adopt a variety of roles in an activity such as performer, coach, referee
  • Apply rules of activity and safety regulations

Coursework (Practical)

This will be 60% of your overall result.  You will be assessed as a coach, official or as a performer in four practical activities from a wide range of categories which includes: Football, Badminton, Netball, Trampolining, Dance, Athletics, Table Tennis, Swimming, Rock Climbing and Fitness.  You will also be tested on your ability to analyse a person’s lifestyle as well as their practical and sporting performance.

Those pupils who participate in activities outside of school can be assessed by either a coach or teacher, improving their chance of gaining higher grades.  Examples of this include Karate, Hockey and Horse-riding.

2 Written Papers (1 hour Per Paper)

Both papers will be divided into two parts. Section A will be 15 multi-choice questions and Section B will consist of longer structured questions.

Paper 1 (B451): An Introduction to Physical Education

  • Key concepts and processes in Physical Education
  • Opportunities, pathways and participation in Physical Education

Paper 2 (B453): Developing knowledge in Physical Education

  • Developing skills, techniques and motivation
  • Developing physical and mental capacity
  • Informed decision making using the principles of training/exercise

To Summarise

4 lessons over the two-week timetable consisting of 2 classroom-based and 2 practical lessons.

60% Practical coursework

40% Written in the form of written examinations

For further information please contact Mr Lamb

ASSESSMENT

Assessment includes 3 parts:

  • 1 written paper of 1 hour 30 minutes worth 40% of the GCSE grade.
  • A research task, which is completed as 7 hours of controlled assessment under supervision in the classroom, worth 20% of the overall GCSE qualification.
  • A child study worth 40% of the GCSE. This is a major piece of work where the students will follow the development of a child between the ages of 0-4 years (the child must still be 4 years of age at the end of the study in March). Students also carry out research of an aspect of development. To complete this each student will arrange 5 visits. 

The initial visit is to observe the child and make notes on the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of the child at the beginning of their study. In the four remaining visits, they will plan and carry out activities with the child to observe his/her developmental progress.

At the end of the study, students will evaluate under classroom supervision, the observed development of the child from the beginning to the end of the study.

Remember All students who take this subject must have access to a child to study aged between 0-4years.

A GCSE in Child development can be used by students to follow a CACHE course, a BTEC Extended Diploma, AS/A2 level course in Sixth Form or a career across a range of Health and Social Care related roles.

For further information please contact Ms Roe

This GCSE provides a vocationally related qualification and is covered over a two year period.  The Health and Social Care GCSE can be a single award (equivalent to one GCSE) or as a double award (equivalent to two GCSEs).

Both options introduce students to work-related learning and provide a comprehensive view of the Health and Social Care sector.  A range of teaching, learning and assessment styles are used to enable and motivate students to achieve the best they can.

What is Studied?

  • Single Award students study 2 compulsory units over 2 years (Units 1 & 2)
  • Double Award students study 4 compulsory units over 2 years (Units 1, 2, 3 & 4)

Unit 1: Understanding Personal Development and Relationships

This unit explores:

  • Human growth and development
  • Factors affecting human growth and development
  • Effects of relationships on personal growth and development
  • The effect of life events on personal development

Unit 2: Exploring Health, Social Care and Early Years Provision

This unit explores:

  • The range of care needs of major client groups
  • How health, social care and early years services are provided.
  • How health, social care and early years services are accessed and the barriers to access
  • Career routes and roles of different staff in health, social care and early years services
  • Care values which underpin service provision

Unit 3: Promoting Health and Well-Being

This unit explores:

  • Understanding health and well-being
  • Factors affecting health and well-being
  • Indicators of physical health
  • Promoting and supporting health improvement

Unit 4: Care Principles in Health, Social Care and Early Years' Practice

This unit explores:

  • The range of care needs of major client groups
  • Care values commonly used in practitioner work
  • The development of self-concept and personal relationships
  • Promoting and supporting health improvement

Assessment

Units 1 and 4 are externally assessed via examinations.  Units 2 and 3 are assessed by controlled assessment tasks i.e., (coursework completed under controlled conditions in class).

Progression

Both options support progression into Further Education, GCE AS and A2, BTEC Firsts and further training for employment opportunities (e.g. NVQs in Health, Social Care and Early Years).

For further information please contact Mr Lamb or Miss Whall

Do you enjoy practical work and being successful?

GCSE Food Technology contains a strong focus on practical work.  It allows candidates to use creativity in the development of food products to meet the needs of clients and consumers.  The design and practical aspect is worth 60% of the final grade.

Students will build and develop skills from Key Stage 3 through independent tasks or mini projects in Year 10.

In Year 11, they will develop a design and make task pre-set by the examination board.  Throughout practical work they will need to demonstrate the safe and hygienic use of tools and equipment.

In order for students to show that the work they produce is their own, the assignment is carried out as a controlled task under the teacher’s supervision over a period of approximately 45 hours.

In addition, students will take a written examination at the end of Year 11 (worth 40% of the final work) which tests knowledge and understanding of topics such as:

  • The functions of food
  • The nutritional properties of food
  • Market influences and client needs
  • Product development and industrial practice
  • Manufacturing processes
  • Food storage

Food Technology develops skills which can be used in careers both within and beyond the food industry.

For further information please contact Mr Jones

Building on what you have learned in Art and Design in Year 9 the course gives you the skills you need to produce innovative, creative art and design across a range of disciplines.

You will be given the opportunity to develop a range of artistic skills and demonstrate these by creatively manipulating a broad range of materials and processes.  Students will have opportunities to work with a range of other disciplines which will include working with:

  • Fine Art - painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture         
  • Fashion / Textiles
  • Graphic Design
  • Photographic / Digital imaging

You will gain experience of working in all of these areas through the beginning of the course but may choose to specialise in one area in Year 11 if you wish to.

In the projects you work through you will use the world around you for inspiration for your ideas and a range of methods including photography can be used to record sources of inspiration.  You will also study cultural influences on art and design as well as the work of professional artists, designers and crafts people.  Ideas will be recorded and developed through a range of methods. Experimentation with materials and processes and creativity is key.

The course is split into two units:

Unit 1: This is the coursework unit in which all project work from Years 10 and 11 is marked as a whole.

Unit 2: This is an externally set assignment which begins in the January of Year 11. Students chose a theme or brief from a choice set by the exam board.  This project then follows the structure of the coursework projects but has a time limit and must have an   outcome generated during a period of controlled assessment.

Both units are assessed on the same criteria which assess your ability to:

  • Understand art and design by analysing the work of designers and crafts people from a range of cultures and historical periods and use this knowledge to develop your own work.
  • Experiment with ideas, materials, and processes.
  • Record ideas and sources of inspiration in a range of appropriate methods.
  • Produce final outcomes, realising intentions making connections with the work of designers and crafts people studied.

If you have any questions about this course see Mr Jones

Building on what you have learned in both Art and Design and Design Technology in Year 9 the 3D Design course gives you the skills you need to produce innovative, creative and well constructed 3 dimensional products.

You will be given the opportunity to develop a range of 3D making skills and demonstrate these by creatively manipulating a broad range of materials and processes.   Working with wood as the principle material through basic carpentry methods, turning, carving, etc will be one of the broadest elements of the course but students will also have opportunities to work with a range of other disciplines if they choose to.

These will include working with:

  • Finishing techniques such as painting, stencilling, distressing, varnishing etc.
  • Working with paper and card through concept modelling.
  • Ceramics through tiling, modelling, throwing and glazing.
  • Textiles through upholstering, dyeing, leatherworking, printing etc.
  • Stained Glass.
  • Jewellery.

Some of these media areas will be offered as part of the course whilst others will be offered as extracurricular after school classes.  Skills learned in these areas can be used to enhance wood based products or to develop outcomes in their own right.

In the projects you work through you will use the world around you for inspiration for your ideas and a range of methods including photography can be used to record sources of inspiration.  You will also study cultural influences on 3D design as well as the work of professional designers and makers.  Ideas will be recorded and developed through a range of taught drawing skills from simple thumbnail sketches to more complex technical drawing and digital design methods.  Experimentation with materials and processes and creativity is key.

The course is split into two units:

Unit 1: This is the coursework unit in which all project work from Years 10 and 11 is marked as a whole.

Unit 2: This is an externally set assignment which begins in the January of Year 11. Students chose a theme or brief from a choice set by the exam board. This project then follows the structure of the coursework projects but has a time limit and must have an outcome generated during a period of controlled assessment.

Both units are assessed separately but marked against the same criteria which assess your ability to:

  • Understand 3D design by analysing the work of designers and crafts people from a range of cultures and historical periods and use this knowledge to develop your own work.
  • Experiment with ideas, materials, and processes.
  • Record ideas and sources of inspiration in a range of appropriate methods.
  • Produce final outcomes and products, realising intentions making connections with the work of designers and crafts people studied.

If you have any questions about this course see Mr Jones

Building on what you have learned in Performing Arts lessons in Year 9 the Performing Arts course gives you a meaningful context through active participation in performance work.

You will be given the opportunity to develop a range of performance, design, technical and

management skills relating to the performing arts industry during the first part of the course in Year 10.  However, as you progress through the course you may chose to specialise in one or more of the following Performing Arts disciplines:

  • Acting
  • Singing
  • Dance
  • Music
  • Music and sound technology
  • Set, props and costume design
  • Marketing and publicity

In the projects you work through you will develop skills in the performance discipline(s) you have chose to work with, plan and research practical work, engage in practical work and performance activities, analyse the working practices of professionals working in the performing arts industries and evaluate the success of your own and other's work.

The course is split into two units:

Unit 1: This is the portfolio unit in which all school set project work from Years 10 and 11 is included.  You will be assessed throughout the course and these assessments are counted towards the final grade.

Unit 2:This is an externally set assignment which takes place in Year 11.  Students choose a theme or brief from a choice set by the exam board.  This project then follows the structure of the portfolio projects but has a time limit.

Both units are assessed separately but marked against the same criteria which assess your ability to:

  • Develop skills in the performance discipline(s) you have chose to work with.
  • Plan and research all practical work.
  • Communicate through practical performance activities.
  • Analyse the working practices of professionals working in the performing arts industries and use this analysis to inform your own work.
  • Evaluate the success of their own and other's work

If you have any questions about this course see Mr Jones

Astley Community High School | Elsdon Avenue | Seaton Delaval | Northumberland | NE25 0BP
T: 0191 237 1505 E: reception@astleyhigh.org